Before One Day At A Time: 8 queer shows canceled by Netflix

Sense8

Despite a campaign on social media to save the show, Netflix announced it will not be renewing One Day At A Time on 14 March.

The show about ‘an American familia’ features a lesbian character in a relationship with a non-binary person. ODAAT was not only praised for its positive representation of the LGBTI community, but also for tackling issues such as sexual consent, homophobia, and racism.

Many in the show’s loyal fanbase took to Twitter to criticize Netflix for the decision. Some pointed out that canceling similar shows conveys the message that certain narratives don’t matter.

The LGBTI series starring Justina Machado and Rita Moreno isn’t the first of its kind to have been axed by the streaming giant.

Throughout the years, we had to say goodbye to several queer shows due to lack of viewers or non-sustainable production costs.

1 Sense8

Sense8 group

The popular 2015 sci-fi drama features eight characters of different sexualities and gender identities who find out they are mentally and emotionally linked.

Applauded for its diversity, the show created by trans sisters Lana and Lilly Wachowski cast trans actress Jamie Clayton in the role of Nomi Marks. Alongside Clayton, several actors of different ethnic background also starred.

When Netflix abruptly canceled the series in 2017, fans protested on social media. Their Twitterstorm earned the show a two-and-a-half-hour series finale featuring the most sensuous orgy scene.

2 Everything Sucks!

Everything Sucks gay comedy Netflix series

Set in the real-life town of Boring, Oregon, in 1996, Everything Sucks! focuses on a bunch of annoying high school kids struggling with first love.

One of the main characters, sophomore Kate (Peyton Kennedy), develops a crush on drama club queen Emaline.

A failed, premature attempt to recreate a sense of nostalgia for the 1990s, the show got axed after just one season. Let’s face it, despite the same-sex storyline, Everything Sucks!… sucked.

3 The Get Down

'My turn'

Starring Jaden Smith, the series is set in the late 1970s and offers a portrayal of the rising hip hop and disco scene.

Baz Luhrmann’s musical drama also briefly explored the queer relationship between Rumi (Jaden Smith) and Thor (Noah Le Gros) without giving too much away.

After releasing 11 episodes, Netflix announced the series was concluded in 2017.

4 Shadowhunters

Shadowhunters included two gay characters in a relationship | Freeform/Disney

Boasting a very passionate fandom, supernatural drama Shadowhunters about demon-trackers feature characters identifying as gay and bisexual.

Internationally distributed by Netflix, the series got canceled in June 2018. Constantin Films, the series producer, reportedly lost its output deal with Netflix, which was funding much of the project.

Freeform announced a two-hour series finale to give the show a proper sendoff. The final episode will air in May 2019.

5 Gypsy

Starring two-time Academy Award nominee Naomi Watts as psychologist Jean Holloway, Gypsy wasn’t more than an average psychological thriller with a problematic title.

Jean begins infiltrating the lives of her patients when she develops an inexplicable attraction to another woman, manipulative barista/musician Sidney.

Netflix canceled the series after one season in 2017.

6 Jessica Jones

Marvel’s Jessica Jones stars Krysten Ritter in the titular role.

Centered on a former superhero who starts working as a private investigator, Jessica Jones received positive reviews for its raw portrayal of sexual assault and harassment and PTSD.

The series also featured powerful lesbian character Jeri Hogarth, a lawyer hiring Jessica to solve her cases. Played by Carrie-Ann Moss, Hogarth was a straight man in the original comic.

Netflix axed the show in February 2019, revealing its upcoming third season will be its last.

7 Super Drags

In Netflix's upcoming animated series Super Drags, popular RPDR queens voice the drag superheroes

Short-lived Brazilian adult animated series features three friends who also perform as drag queens.

In a Powerpuff Girls fashion, Scarlet Carmesim, Lemon Chifon, and Safira Cyan, aka The Super Drags, are responsible for protecting the LGBTI community.

Featuring the voice of drag queen Pabllo Vittar, the English version sees RPDR contestants Trixie Mattel, Ginger Minj, Willam, and Shangela lending their voices to the characters.

8 Degrassi: Next Class

The last incarnation of high school drama franchise Degrassi, Next Class has several queer characters.

Particularly, the character of Tristan Milligan (Lyle Lettau) struggles not only with his sexuality but also with his body image. Tristan eventually loses his virginity to bisexual Miles (Eric Osborne).

The show also features a female same-sex couple, Zoe and Rasha, played by Ana Golja and Dalia Yegavian respectively.

Jointly produced by Netflix, Epitome Pictures and DHX Media, Degrassi officially came to an end on 7 March 2019.

Read also:

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Author: Stefania Sarrubba

The post Before One Day At A Time: 8 queer shows canceled by Netflix appeared first on Gay Star News.

Netflix cancels hit-show One Day At A Time, LGBTI fans react angrily

Syd and Elena in One Day At A Time.

Netflix took to Twitter today (14 March) to announce it will not be renewing One Day At A Time.

In a four-part Twitter thread, they stated how hard the decision was to make.

‘We’ve made the very difficult decision not to renew One Day At A Time for a fourth season,’ they tweeted. ‘The choice did not come easily — we spent several weeks trying to find a way to make another season work but in the end simply not enough people watched to justify another season.’

Netflix US then continued: ‘Thank you Norman Lear for bringing this series back to television. Thank you Gloria Calderon Kellett and Mike Royce for always making us laugh and never shying away from bravely and beautifully tackling tough subject matter in a meaningful way.

‘To Justina Machado, Todd Grinnell, Isabella Gomez, Marcel Ruiz, Stephen Tobolowsky, and Rita Moreno: thank you for inviting us into your family. You filled this show with so much heart and warmth and love, it truly felt like home.’

They concluded: ‘And to anyone who felt seen or represented — possibly for the first time — by ODAAT, please don’t take this as an indication your story is not important.

‘The outpouring of love for this show is a firm reminder to us that we must continue finding ways to tell these stories,’ Netflix tweeted.

Fans respond to the cancelation

Fans then tweeted their disappointment about the lack of renewal for One Day At A Time.

One fan wrote: ‘Try again. You absolutely just told all these people their story doesn’t matter. Check the things you renew, half of which I’ve never seen before. I just might be canceling my subscription.’

Another replied: ‘Here’s one way: Don’t cancel ODAAT.’

Then another responded: ‘It’s really hard to feel like our representation matters when the marketing for this show was heavily relied on the actors begging on Twitter and not your own marketing team.’

Co-creators Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce actually had a meeting with Netflix at the end of February to decide the fate of the show.

As a result of the meeting, Calderón Kellett tweeted: ‘They made clear that they love the show, love how it serves underrepresented audiences, love its heart and humor, but… we need more viewers.

‘They’ll decide soon,’ she added. She then urged people to watch the show, so Netflix couldn’t cancel it.

One Day At A Time

One Day At A Time was an American sitcom that originally aired on CBS from 1975 to 1984.

It focussed on the story of a divorced mother raising two teenage daughters.

Netflix brought the hit-show back in 2017, but reimagined the family as Cuban-American.

Upon its release, critics and journalists praised the show for its diverse representation, as well as performances from Justina Machado and Rita Moreno.

It also features strong representation for the non-binary community.

One of the protagonists, teenager Elena (Isabella Gomez) comes out as a lesbian and starts dating Syd. They identify as non-binary and repeatedly schools audiences on how to use the correct pronouns.

See also:

Asia’s first LGBT streaming service looks to expand into India

Netflix’s new reality dating show features LGBTI couples and people of color

New Netflix show is a comedy about a gay man with cerebral palsy

Author: James Besanvalle

The post Netflix cancels hit-show One Day At A Time, LGBTI fans react angrily appeared first on Gay Star News.

Netflix may cancel One Day At A Time — this is why LGBTIs should be worried

Syd and Elena in One Day At A Time.

Critically acclaimed Netflix’s One Day At A Time might get canceled, decreasing LGBTI representation across the streaming giant’s catalog.

The series is a reboot of the 1975-84 show of the same name, following a Cuban-American family through everyday life.

What makes the reboot remarkable, however, is the way it tackles issues such as sexism and sexual consent, alongside racism, homophobia and mental health.

The show also boasts some positive LGBTI characters, serving underrepresented audiences such as the non-binary community.

One of the protagonists, teenager Elena (Isabella Gomez) comes out as a lesbian and starts dating Syd. They identify as non-binary and repeatedly school audiences on how to use the correct pronouns.

‘Tell friends to watch!’

Co-created by Gloria Calderón Kellett and Mike Royce, the show has a loyal fanbase. Nonetheless, this might not be enough for Netflix to greenlight a renewal.

After a meeting with Netflix’s executives, Calderón Kellett called on fans to spread the word about the show.

‘They made clear that they love the show, love how it serves underrepresented audiences, love its heart & humor, but…we need more viewers. They’ll decide soon,’ she said on 20 February.

‘I wish I felt more confident. WHAT CAN YOU DO? Tell friends to watch!’

In the tweet, she also included the Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer score for each of the three seasons. One Day At A Time has a 100% fresh score on the last two seasons and a 97% score on season one.

Isabella Gomez also joined the cause, retweeting the original post and including a rainbow flag emoji.

‘#ODAAT fans, we need your help. We adore this show and the representation and perspectives we get to bring to TV. So, if you’d like a S4, let @netflix know! Get your friends to watch! Spread the word!’ she tweeted.

Fans are begging for season four of One Day At A Time

Many in the ODAAT fandom have taken to social media to ask Netflix to renew the show.

One more reason for Netflix to renew One Day At A Time?

Blessing fans with more scenes like the iconic moment where legendary West Side Story actress Rita Moreno — who plays Elena’s Catholic grandmother, Lydia — finds out her granddaughter is a lesbian.

Watch the clip below:

Read also:

Asia’s first LGBT streaming service looks to expand into India

Netflix’s new reality dating show features LGBTI couples and people of color

New Netflix show is a comedy about a gay man with cerebral palsy

Author: Stefania Sarrubba

The post Netflix may cancel One Day At A Time — this is why LGBTIs should be worried appeared first on Gay Star News.